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Phone: (562) 433-0478
Sol Foot & Ankle Centers

Adjusting To Your New Orthotics

Your new custom foot orthotics have been molded and designed specifically for you, and your feet.

During the next few weeks, your body will gradually become accustomed to the new alignment provided by your new orthotics.  Because each individual is different the adjustment period may vary, so we encourage you to "break-in" the orthotics slowly.

By improving the function of your foot, your orthotics also change the function of the muscles in your foot and ankle.  In addition, they also improve alignment altering how much the foot rolls in and how the leg is positioned. Because of these changes, it is important you break- in your orthotics gradually. Otherwise, you may experience foot, leg, knee, hip or even back pain.

DO NOT wear your orthotics while running or participating in other sports until after the first week and until you find them comfortable for walking.  After a one week break-in period, wear your orthotics as much as you can for the next two weeks.

Make sure to follow-up with your podiatrist to ensure the orthotics are fitting properly and that your feet are improving. If you have any questions, don't hesitate to call  (562) 433-0478.

 

Follow the orthotic break-in schedule below when adjusting to your new orthotics.

First Day

Second Day 

Third Day 

Fourth Day

Fifth Day

1 - 2 Hours

2 - 3 Hours

4 - 5 Hours 

 6 - 7 Hours 

 8 Hours

 

Other Notes:

It is normal for the orthotics to feel a bit odd at first. However, if at any time during the break-in period you experience pain that lasts for more than a day in your ankles, knees, hips, or back you should stop wearing the orthotics and call your doctor.

You should expect slow, gradual improvement as your body adapts to the orthotics. Other treatments may be necessary to relieve symptoms and help you to improve more quickly. These may include medication, exercise, physical therapy, changes in shoes or activities, or even immobilization in a cast or walking boot. Let your doctor know if you don’t feel like you’re improving as you expected and he/she will work with you to find the best treatment plan for your condition.

 

Did you know? 

During one's lifetime, the average person has walked enough steps to have traveled around the world more than 4 times, or approximately 115,000 miles.